Moon Hill

As I approached the last days of my holiday and faced the grim prospect of returning to work, Curry and Erica invited us out for dinner.  The told us that they knew of a lovely restaurant atop a hotel with a view of Moon Hill.  I had wanted, since I had visited Yansghuo, to climb to the top of Moon Hill but the opportunity never presented itself.  I promised that I would climb it on my next visit but did look forward to the prospect of seeing a nice view of it before I went home.  Sure enough, when we arrived at the hotel, there was indeed a spectacular view of the mountain with the hole pierced right through it.  The hole is quite round but from this close proximity we could only see the upper half of the circle.  Later, Anya did climb it and said that it provided wonderful views of Yangshuo and its beautiful mountains.

At the front door of the hotel and restaurant we could see the aftermath of the New Years celebrations; huge piles of fireworks discards were everywhere.  Even though it was a few days past New Years, the rockets and bombs were still exploding with regularity.  Occasionally, one would explode rather nearby and I would have an Iraq flashback, just for a second, before I realized I was in a safe and happy place.

Throughout dinner, the inside of the darkened restaurant was lightened by the flashes of the rocket explosions and the windows rattled with the nearby “booms.”  I thought of how much money it must take to keep a barrage going for a solid week and thought of the newfound affluence of China and its people.

Erica brought her baby, little Dodo, who we finally met for the first time after hearing about her for so many months.  Her sister and niece also came along and it was nice to sit down to a proper “family” meal.

The restaurant was Italian in style and pulled off an incredible bruschetta, pizza and the garlic bread was phenomenal.  We made a selection of an imported Italian Chianti and toasted to friends and good times together.  I will really miss my Chinese friends and hope that we will stay in touch after my departure.

 


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go where you can

There is a huge difference in the customs and practice of public hygiene in China versus most western countries.  In America, public urination could result in a fine or being arrested by the police.  But in China, it is commonplace.  I can’t count the number of times I saw men casually walk over to the edge of a building or in an alley, whip our their willy and just hose away.  There seems to be an exceptional tolerance for children using the toilet as it is common for parents to untrap their children’s hinged bottom flap on their pants and let them dump or pee wherever they happen to be at the moment.

In the photo above, this woman was having her child relieve him/herself right in the middle of the walking street in Yangshuo.  I almost tripped right over them as we walked through.  Mind you, this is in a HEAVY traffic area and right in front of shops and vendor’s stalls (I shot the photo below in the same area at the same time as the photo above).  Finding a public toilet is sometimes hit and miss in China; usually the public toilets are a pay to use affair but the cost is only a few pennies.  Well, just another cultural difference to chalk up to experience…

 


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what is that game?

 

 

Walking by the park along the shore of the Li River, we saw these Chinese children playing this card game.  We watched for quite a while but we were not able to figure out the rules.  It seemed to be a mix of POGs, 3 Card Monte, and a little WWF wrestling style thrown in.  Have a look, maybe you can figure it out…


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Stories, posts, reports, photos, videos and all other content on this site is copyright protected © and is the property of Scott Traveler unless otherwise indicated, all rights reserved. Content on this site may not be reproduced without permission from Scott Traveler. My contact information can be found on the home page.

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