Multsuk Sand Dunes

I’ve always liked sand dunes, so I was excited to see the sand dunes in the Gobi.  We were nearing the end of a long day and the chance to stretch our legs while climbing the dunes was a welcome break from the truck.  It was still quite cold outside; not as cold as the North Gobi, but it was still only hit a high of about 18 Celsius (about -8 F).  I had Simya drop me off at the first dune while he and Soyoloo drove on to the next – in this way I was able to shoot a photo of our truck in front of the dunes to give them some scale of size.

In every direction there was nothing but desert.  For the entire afternoon we didn’t see anyone at all and it was nice to have the entire horizon to myself…

It is quite amazing to see the dunes just rise up out of the desert, the floor of the desert is small pebble and rock and the sand dune just climbs above it all.

I noticed how any object left laying on the floor of the desert (in this case a camel terd) collects sand as the wind blows it.  I began to wonder if at the bottom of each of these large dunes rested a camel or horse…?


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big horn sheep

As we departed the Monastery to head back to Baga Gazriin, Simya pointed out some big horn sheep that were grazing on some grass that poked through the snow on the valley floor.  He warned me to get my camera ready and then he raced towards the big ram that was closest to us.  We gained some ground and before he could completely run away, I exited the truck and took this shot of him as he ran towards the safety of the hills and cliffs.

 

 

Once he reached the safety of the hilltop, he and two of his “ladies” looked back at me to see what I would do next.  I swore at myself for having left my SLR camera (Sony A100) and 300 millimeter lens at home.  I shot some pics with the little “midget” camera; thankfully, the large megapixel count allowed for me to (at least) crop and expand these photos:

Of course, the ram and the sheep looked much bigger to the naked eye than my little camera capture in these photos.  But, I felt so privileged to be able to see big horn sheep in the wild, something that has always been a dream of mine.


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Stories, posts, reports, photos, videos and all other content on this site is copyright protected © and is the property of Scott Traveler unless otherwise indicated, all rights reserved. Content on this site may not be reproduced without permission from Scott Traveler. My contact information can be found on the home page.

Back to home page: http://scotttraveler.com