Pit 1, Terra Cotta Warriors

I finally made it to the last and largest excavation site.  There was a certain “wow” effect when you walked through the front door and came up to the edge of the viewing area.  It was indeed a massive place.  The soldiers lined up by the thousands.  I tried to imagine what it was like 1800 years ago as thousands of laborers worked to install and then bury these stone replica soldiers.

Each of the Terra Cotta soldiers was vividly painted and carried weapons; in the empty hands of the soldiers, you can see where a wooden polled halberd was placed.  Over the years, the wood decayed but the soldiers remained.

On the sides of the walls between the soldiers you can see the grooves where the supporting logs were placed that formed the roofs of the burial chambers.

As I walked along the side of the massive excavation building, I looked back and shot a photo of the entrance.  It should help give some scale to how massive the place was.  The next photo is a composite of three shots I made from the entrance.  I’ll never travel without my SLR + wide angle lense ever again…

Towards the back of the exhibit I was able to get down close to the soldiers as they were originally placed.  It was an amazing experience and a fulfillment of a dream I’ve had for over 30 years…


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Terra Cotta Warriors, pit 2

The second pit was much larger than the third.  I was not able to capture the width of the large warehouse-sized room with my little Sony Cyber-shot camera.  Instead, I took a pair of photos and stitched them together; sooner or later I will learn how do stitch photos using Adobe Photoshop…

The soldiers were placed in long open pits and then covered with long logs, soil was then placed atop the logs and then the entire site was reburied.  In this way, underground chambers were created.

The downside to this technique was that over time the logs gave way and sagged and eventually collapsed leaving the hollow soldier statues broken and crushed.  However, some did survive the weight of the earth and remained intact.

Some beautiful statues and artifacts survived the 1800 years since they were buried.  In this photo I took you can see a wagon wheel and the remains of a soldier statue.

Later, I would visit one of the museum exhibits that housed the horses and chariots, photos of their excavation was on display:

Unfortunately, since the Terra Cotta Warriors were unearthed, they have begun to decay; the paint that originally covered them is fading each year that they are exposed to sunlight.  When originally excavated, the bright paint that covered them was still quite visible.  I captured some photos of the excavation display.  It is remarkable to think that thousands of these soldiers were handmade, painted, and then buried in elaborate ceremony.

I took so many photos at this site.  But it is impossible to post them all.  I have tried to capture the essence of my visit without missing out on anything important.  Many of the original statues were on display behind glass.  In this photo, one of the high-ranking generals was on display and I was able to pose next to him for a pic:


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Stories, posts, reports, photos, videos and all other content on this site is copyright protected © and is the property of Scott Traveler unless otherwise indicated, all rights reserved. Content on this site may not be reproduced without permission from Scott Traveler. My contact information can be found on the home page.

Back to home page: http://scotttraveler.com